Startup

A Pivot is Worth Experiencing

When a man has an idea, it has to be a billion-dollar idea. The idea is good (if not the best). The way in which he wants to achieve something, is exactly the one that will give him the desired effect.

When a man has an idea, it has to be a billion-dollar idea. The idea is good (if not the best). The way in which he wants to achieve something, is exactly the one that will give him the desired effect. Chosen business model has to bring the first billion dollars (a million is just a million: a billion – now that sounds hot!).

Such thinking is strange.

There are thousands of companies being set up every day. Business models (or ways of reaching success) are at least as many as startuppers. Yet not every idea is good enough. Not every company will conquer the market, not every service will find applause.

But a man knows his own. He has an idea, and he realizes it. He has ten ideas (daily), so in that case he’ll implement all of them. Because what if one of them doesn’t work out (and others won’t work out, not because the idea was bad or that the implementation wasn’t right, but because the users are stupid or still unprepared for such a revolution).

Of course, I’m generalizing. But still… that’s often the case.

On the other hand, how is it supposed to be, when defeat is treated as defeat, and not as a lesson for the future? And yet what teaches us people best? What gives us the biggest kick? What do we remember best? Something which bungles us. If a man makes a mistake which cost him (time, money, reputation, whatever) – he’ll learn to minimise the given risk for the future.

It can’t also be another way, when an average investor demands only return on his investments, not innovation, improvement, changes in people’s lives, or (oh this is perfect!) “learning” something for the future by a startupper. And yet that’s exactly thanks to fresh, innovative, daring service, we can achieve real success on the global market. Sure, these services are subject to risk. Much higher risk. Well, but how could it be any different, when we want to achieve something on the global (and fast-changing) market.

We look at successful young entrepreneurs and say to ourselves – sure, so can I. I’m similar. And who knows, if not better. I’m going to be like Gary. Or Tim. Or Jason. Or Mark. I’ll create something which will conquer the world. And surely this will be the idea which I’ve now got in my head. Implemented in just the way, how I want to implement it. In the business model, which I’ll think up in a moment.

That is nothing, but bullshit.

Good products don’t come from nowhere. Rarely the first idea off the shore is really a good one. Rarely do we know at once, how to sell it, how to promote it and how to implement it.

I know start-uppers who gained money from investors for some web-based app. Within three years they implemented it. Three times they rewrote the code from scratch. Why? Because it could’ve been more well written. Because it works too slowly and people won’t want to use the product. Because the product can be nicer. They haven’t even thought about the fact, that the assumptions may have been wrong. That there might be something wrong with their approach. That it might have been better to launch something smaller, but working well and taking feedback, which would allow them to develop in an appropriate direction.

I know people who – as bosses – don’t allow their business partners or employees to implement any of their ideas (even the simplest). They don’t even let them try. They don’t let them check. Because there is no time for experimentation. We have to work on developing the bosses vision. Tick tock, tick tock. Clock is ticking. Competitors are catching up. They didn’t even thought that thanks to trying different ways, we can find ourselves on the right one.

I know people, who don’t turn back to their earlier chosen way. Despite seeing it from far off that the following idea leads nowhere.

There is nothing wrong in a pivot! There is nothing wrong in change. There is nothing wrong in a mistake. In experimentation. In looking for other ways of development. Testing other solutions.

It’s not worth being afraid of change. It’s not worth avoiding pivots. It’s not worth not asking. It’s not worth not trying, not experimenting.

In the end changes are good. They allow us to keep up on the surface.

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